Intermountain Adventist Academy


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Watch what kids drink!
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Watch what kids drink!

Sugary soft drinks (soda, sweetened tea, lemonade, and juice drinks): Children who drink more sweetened drinks consume more calories and are more likely to be overweight than kids who drink fewer soft drinks. Soft drinks also displace healthful foods in kids’ diets like milk, which can help prevent osteoporosis, and 100% juice, which can help prevent heart disease and cancer. In addition, soda pop can cause dental cavities and tooth decay.

When it comes to choosing drinks for your family, water is the best choice for anyone to satisfy thirst and does not have sugar or calories.  It's best when kids are used to drinking water instead of sugary drinks from young age.  Carbonated drinks such as seltzer, sparkling water, and club soda are healthy options.  You can serve them alone or mix them with equal amounts of 100% juice to make a "healthy sodas".  When choosing a "juice", look for 100% fruit juice and avoid the added sugars of juice drinks, punches, fruit cocktail drinks, or lemonade. Drinks that contain at least 50% juice and no additional caloric sweeteners are also healthful options. To find 100% juice, look at beverage nutrition labels for the percentage of the beverage that is juice. Orange, grapefruit, and pineapple juices are more nutrient-dense and are healthier than apple, grape, and pear juices. Many beverages like Capri Sun, V8-Splash, Tropicana Twisters, Sunny Delight, Kool Aid Jammers, Hi-C, or Welch’s or Snapple are easily mistaken for juice. However, be aware! those beverages are more like soda than healthy juice – they are merely sugar water with a few tablespoons of added juice.

Fruit juice can be rich in vitamins, minerals, and cancer-fighting compounds. However, it is high in calories. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children ages 1-6 years old drink no more than 6 ounces (one serving) of juice a day and children ages 7-18 years old drink no more than 12 ounces (two servings) of juice a day.